The web side of Google Drive is powerful. The first mistake people make is when it comes to sharing. If I share a file with you in Google Drive, it shows up in “Shared with me.” We’ll cover this in more detail when we get to sharing and collaboration, but for now know this. The process, once you understand it, works better than any other service out there. In short, it allows you to keep files that were shared with you, wherever you want, without upsetting the link to the shared file itself. I’ve moved folders that were shared with me in Dropbox, and the link broke, so that the files were no longer shared. They became separate copies of files that were no longer shared. This doesn’t happen with Google Drive.

The web side of Google drive is what you see when you are running it in your browser, of course. This is distinguished from the desktop sync, where you can manage the files in local folders on your desktop.

When something initially lands in “shared with me” you have to log in on the web. All you need to do is move it to the “My Drive” folder, and then it will sync instantly to your desktop. From there, you can move it anywhere you want, either on the web, or on your desktop folder.

While you’re on the web, you can easily manage native Google Docs, and you can also convert office docs into their Google Doc counterparts in a click. Actually in a right click.

You can easily manage files and folders from the Google Docs web app. What’s more important is how many applications have integrations with Google Docs. Google docs is easy to integrate with.

In this video you’ll see an example of how Google Docs integrates beautifully with Evernote. I use both Evernote and Google Docs to manage the lessons in my courses.

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